Rest and Relaxation
Water
Stress Management
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Exercise

SUPPLEMENTATION

What are Supplements?​

​According to the Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act, a dietary supplement is a product (other than tobacco) that:• Is intended to supplement the diet• Contains one or more dietary ingredients (including vitamins; minerals; herbs or other botanicals; amino acids; and other substances) or their constituents• Is intended to be taken by mouth as a pill, capsule, tablet, or liquid• Is labeled on the front panel as being a dietary supplement

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(Source: About.com)

Hot Coffee, Tea and Spices
Habitual drinking of liquids that are too hot, or consuming an excess of irritants such as coffee, tea or pickles and spices can cause inflammation of the digestive linings, resulting in a drop in secretion of digestive fluids and poorer extraction of vitamins and minerals from food.​

 

Alcohol
Drinking too much alcohol is known to damage the liver and pancreas, which are vital to digestion and metabolism. It can also damage the lining of the intestinal tract and adversely affect the absorption of nutrients, leading to sub-clinical malnutrition. Alcohol affects availability, absorption and metabolism of nutrients.

Smoking
Smoking too much tobacco is also an irritant to the digestive tract and increases the metabolic requirements of Vitamin C. Vitamin C, which is normally present in such foods as paw paws and oranges, oxidizes rapidly once these fruits are cut, juiced, cooked or stored in direct sunlight or near heat. Vitamin C is important to the immune function.

Laxatives
Overuse of laxatives can result in poor absorption of vitamins and minerals from food, by hastening the intestinal transit time. Paraffin and other mineral oils increase losses of fat soluble vitamins A, E and K. Other laxatives used to excess can cause large losses of minerals such as potassium, sodium and magnesium.

Fad Diets
Crazy diets that miss out on whole groups of foods can be seriously lacking in vitamins. Even the popular low fat diets, if taken to an extreme, can be deficient in vitamins A, D and E. Vegetarian diets, which can exclude meat and other animal sources, must be very skillfully planned to avoid vitamin B12 deficiency, which may lead to anemia.

Overcooking
Lengthy cooking or reheating of meat and vegetables can oxidize and destroy heat susceptible vitamins such as the B-group, C and E. Boiling vegetables leaches the water soluble vitamins B-group and C as well as many minerals. Light steaming is preferable. Some vitamins, such as vitamin B6 can be destroyed by irradiation from microwaves.

Convenience Foods
A diet overly dependent on highly refined carbohydrates, such as sugar, white flour and white rice, places greater demand on additional sources of B-group vitamins to process these carbohydrates. An unbalanced diet contributes to such conditions as irritability, lethargy and sleep disorders.

Food Processing
Freezing food containing vitamin E can significantly reduce its levels once defrosted. Foods containing vitamin E exposed to heat and air can turn rancid. Many common sources of vitamin E, such as bread and oils are nowadays highly processed, so that the vitamin E content is significantly reduced or missing totally, which increases storage life but can lower nutrient levels. Vitamin E is an antioxidant which defensively inhibits oxidative damage to all tissues. Other vitamin losses from food processing include vitamin B1 and C.

Crop Nutrient Losses
Some agricultural soils are deficient in trace elements. Decades of intensive agriculture can overwork and deplete soils, unless all the soil nutrients, including trace elements, are regularly replaced. This means that food crops can be depleted of nutrients due to poor soil management.

P.M.T
Research has demonstrated that up to 60 per cent of women suffering from symptoms of premenstrual tension, such as headaches, irritability, bloatedness, breast tenderness, lethargy and depression can benefit from supplementation with vitamin B6.

  

Light Eaters

Some people eat very sparingly, even without weight reduction goals. US dietary surveys have shown that an average woman maintains her weight on 7560 kilojoules per day, at which level her diet is likely to be low in thiamine, calcium and iron.

Oral Contraceptives
Oral Contraceptives can decrease absorption of folic acid and increase the need for vitamin B6, and possibly vitamin C, zinc and riboflavin.

Stress
Chemical, physical and emotional stresses can increase the body’s requirements for vitamins B2, B5, B6 and C. Air pollution increases the requirements for vitamin E.

Poor Digestion
Even when your food intake is good, inefficient digestion can limit your body’s uptake of vitamins. Some common causes of inefficient digestion are not chewing well enough and eating too fast. Both of these result in larger than normal food particle size, too large to allow complete action of digestive enzymes.

Cleanse- Wash your skin thoroughly on a daily basis to remove the dirt, debris,

pollutants, and perspiration that has accumulated. Avoid bar soaps as they

tend to dry out the skin. Consider a creamy cleanser for dry skin or a clear

cleanser for oily skin.  For normal to oily skin wash with a gentle cleanser. After

you have found a cleanser that works well with your skin type stick to it as much

as possible. If you have dry or sensitive skin, use only warm water to wash your

skin and use a mild natural cleanser every few days. Brushing your teeth before

washing your face is a good practice because toothpaste residue can irritate

sensitive facial skin. Be careful though, not to cleanse too often and remember

to wash at night before going to bed. Most women prefer the water method:

Use warm water to loosen dirt and clogged pores. Use a dime-sized bit of

cleanser, and then rinse with cool or lukewarm water. You'll also want to take

off your makeup with a proper makeup remover.
In the morning, a splash of lukewarm water is all you need (we find it's great for removing excess oils from your nightly moisturizing). Never wash your face with hot or cold water (both can cause broken capillaries). Also be careful about over cleansing skin, see signs you are over cleansing your skin.

 

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Exfoliate- This is a great part of any good skin care routine because the results are immediate when done properly. Most people skip this step in their weekly skincare routine. Scrubs work by removing the top layer of dead skin cells that tend to dull your complexion. Make sure you use a gentle scrub with tiny grains. Big grains in cheap scrubs can tear skin and cause more harm than good. Where the skin is not exfoliated on a daily or weekly basis, dead skin cells build up causing your skin to look dull and older. Some experts recommend exfoliating in the morning, since the skin repairs itself at night, when the dead skin cells can be scrubbed away.

 For best results scrub once or twice a week, rubbing in a circular motion for 30 sec. then rinse with lukewarm water. Proper exfoliation means that your foundation will smooth out more cleanly and your moisturizer will soak in more completely.

 

Moisturize- Unless you have very oily skin it is important that you moisturize every day to keep your skin hydrated and healthy. Your skin needs moisturizer all year long as both the indoor winter heat, and summer sun can be equally damaging to your skin.​


Protect- Use a natural sunscreen when possible, regardless of whether or not you plan on spending much time in the sun. Our skin needs sunlight every day but over exposure can have adverse effects. Experts recommend a natural sunscreen or a moisturizer that contains sunscreen with at least an SPF of 15, every day. The sun’s most beneficial rays occur at sunrise and sunset. The skincare experts agree that sunscreen is the most important part of any skincare regimen. 

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